International Symposium on Cereal Leaf Blights 2019 | University College Dublin, Ireland | 22-24 May 2019

The impact of barley variety rotation, mixtures, and intercropping on leaf disease and silage production


Thomas Turkington*
Lacombe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Henry Klein-Gebbinck
Beaverlodge Research Farm, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Neil Harker
Lacombe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

John O'Donovan
Lacombe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Breanne Tidemann
Lacombe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Hiroshi Kubota
Lacombe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Robert Blackshaw
Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Charles Geddes
Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Tim McAllister
Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Newton Lupwayi
Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Jayakrishnan Nair
Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Kequan Xi
Crop Genetics Section, Field Crop Development Centre, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry


Oral Presentation
Cultural Management, Fungicide Resistance and Epidemiology

Moore Auditorium, UCD O'Brien centre for Science
22 May 2019, 12:40

View this abstract online by visting isclb2019.com/see/ABS93600

Western Canadian barley silage producers, whether they are meeting on-farm needs or local market opportunities, will often look at continuous barley production, which leads to productivity issues related to leaf disease development. Although fungicides can be used, they represent an added input cost for silage producers.  The objective of the current study was to determine the effects of monocultures, mixtures, intercropping and rotational diversity on crop health and productivity in a cereal silage production system.  Three year rotational treatments were established in 2008 at Lacombe, Alberta with a final combined comparison for 2010, 2013 and 2016.  Treatments included: continuous barley, same variety; a mixture of the same three barley varieties each year; a mixture of three different barley varieties each year; an intercrop of barley, oat, and spring triticale with the same or different crop varieties each year; and an intercrop of barley, oat, and winter triticale with the same or different crop varieties each year.  In 2010, 2013 and 2016, all treatments had the six-row barley variety Sundre.  Leaf disease severity on Sundre was highest for continuous Sundre, and lowest for mixtures or intercrops with different varieties.  Silage yields were lowest for continuous Sundre, highest for the intercropping treatments with the same or different varieties each year, and intermediate for barley mixtures where the variety components changed each year.  Results suggest that adding diversity in crop types and/or barley genetics may reduce leaf disease and improve silage productivity.