International Symposium on Cereal Leaf Blights 2019 | University College Dublin, Ireland | 22-24 May 2019

Improvement resistance of winter triticale to Parastagonospora nodorum


Lidia Kowalska*
Department of Plant Pathology, Plant Breeding and Acclimatization Institute-National Research Institute, Radzikow, 05-870 Blonie, Poland

Edward Arseniuk
Department of Plant Pathology, Plant Breeding and Acclimatization Institute-National Research Institute, Radzikow, 05-870 Blonie, Poland


Poster Presentation
Host Genetics and Resistance Breeding

Atrium, UCD O'Brien centre for Science
Poster 49

View this abstract online by visting isclb2019.com/see/ABS87142

The fungus Parastagonospora nodorum is a necrotrophic pathogen of triticale in many parts of the world. It causes disease by secreting proteinaceous effectors which interact with proteins encoded by dominant susceptibility genes in the host. The outcome of these interaction results in the pathogen affected plant tissue allow the fungus to thrive and survive on dead plant material. During last years appeared reports on proteinaceous host selective toxins produced by P. nodorum in infected plant tissue. The Tox3 is the most common toxin produced by isolates collected in Poland. In this study, an effort was undertaken to compare seedlings of winter triticale somaclonal and dihaploid lines and conventional varieties according to P. nodorum resistance and sensitivity to Tox3 among.

Nine triticale cultivars, nineteen somaclonal lines and twenty-two double haploids produced from cultivars varying in resistance to P. nodorum were evaluated under controlled environment conditions. The first seedling leaves were inoculated with a mixture of P. nodorum isolates. After 10 days of incubation, the disease severity on seedling leaves was rated on a disease severity scale, where >90% – susceptible, <10% – resistant. The differences between seedling leaves for all components were statistically significant. Higher resistance to P. nodorum was observed more often on leaves of somaclonal lines then on dihaploid ones. Some of genotypes were showing low leaf infection, e.g. dihaploid D-46 and somaclone S-43. A correlation between the triticale line sensitivity to Tox3 toxin with phenotypic susceptibility to P. nodorum was observed at the seedling stage. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that somaclonal variation might be used as an additional source of triticale germplasm enhancement according to its resistance to the pathogen in question. The use of Tox3 test to identify and eliminate susceptible triticale genotypes has clear advantages and it can be recommended to use in breeding programs.